Exploring the new ABRSM flute syllabus 2018: Grade 7

Whisper it quietly but this might be time to invest in whole pieces or compilation books, rather than buy the ABRSM book itself!

List A:

This is another strong list with a more diverse range of periods than often.

The Rabboni Sonata in D major is particularly tuneful and highly recommended, especially for those less likely to be at home in the Baroque period.

For those who are, the Telemann Sonata in G major is a strong choice. Gluck’s Che faro senza Euridice arranged by Boehm is an absolutely wonderful piece published in the ABRSM book but it’s also available in Romantic Miniatures Volume 2 which you could then use for grade 8!

 

Less familiar are:

Frederick the Great: Allegro from Sonata in B flat Spitta No 76.

If you splashed out on the complete volume of these sonatas for grade 5 this one is a great option here. It’s also available separately and is well worth the money as the whole sonata is delightful.

The movement set is a lovely and sprightly fast movement which could be  tricky for the fingers. If you can sort out the tonguing to suit yourself you will be rewarded with a happy piece that will bring joy to everyone!

Serini: Andantino grazioso and Allegro assai from Sonata No 1 in D major

The beautiful slow movement which is quite Romantic in character is followed by a very lively Allegro assai. This is fiddly rather than difficult with the editorial trills making the writing very intricate.  It’s a challenge, as it should be at this level, but refreshingly different.

 

 

List B:

Again, the supporting pieces are strong. You may not need to look any further than the Poulenc, Faure, Berkeley or Tea for Two but there are other really interesting options available to explore too!

Edward German: Intermezzo

This is a lovely Intermezzo with a rather rambling rhapsodic format that is charming .It will need work to cement the ensemble as a result, especially as there are several changes of speed. Definitely worth a look though, especially if you liked the Saltarello from the last syllabus.

Moszkowski: Spanish Dance from 300 Years of Flute Music.

This will be valuable if you are looking for slightly less daunting. The Spanish style is one that everyone knows and there is plenty of character in the writing to help with interpretation. Blessed with a straightforward structure, this is definitely not as technically demanding as some of the other pieces. You may also have this book already so it makes sense to play something completely different from it!

Paul Wachs: La Flute de Pan from Romantic Miniatures Volume 1

This is another great French flute piece that has a lot in common with the  Mel Bonis that is published in the ABRSM book. It’s a little more straightforward in harmonic style though. It has a charming rhythmic simplicity, and if you have a student with a supple tone, good breathing and decent intonation, this is perfect!

List C:

There are some most interesting studies set for this grade which includes both core repertoire and the opportunity to leave your comfort zone! You might have already introduced your student to the Telemann Fantasias, or the  CPE Bach Unaccompanied Sonata so you’re instantly ahead of the game! However, be sure not to miss the expressive Prill Study in D minor from More Graded Studies Book 2 which is a tone colour challenge, and there is  the Toreador’s Song from The Bizet Notebook if you need something very well-known.  As ever though, there is always room for something different!

Alicia Hart: Scats from Scatadoodle

This book features at grades 4 and 5 (good value again!) and introduces the concept of the scat-singing technique used by jazz players. It’s a great choice if your accompanied pieces are more traditional. This piece has a natural swing rhythm which should be quite easy to learn as the patterns are quite repetitive. It’s technically fairly demanding with some big leaps around the flute but it’s is very well written with plenty of places to breathe. Playing this from memory would be relatively easy for any player used to doing this and would be very impressive in the exam!

There is just so much quality in the music set for this grade that you could quite easily never repeat the same set of pieces – even over 3 years!

 

 

Exploring the new ABRSM flute syllabus 2018: Grade 6

The choice of repertoire in all three lists is very wide and there is quite a variation in standard. Programme planning is a must now  and there is so much to choose from  – an embarrassment of riches!

List A:

All the greats are represented on this list so you may feel that Bach, Handel and Telemann are all you need to complement the repertoire from the ABRSM grade 6 book. This would mean you miss out on these gems though!

Drouet: Allegro Moderato from Sonata in A minor from Three Little Sonatas for Flute and Piano

This is the first movement of the Sonata which has been used at grades 4 and 5 so you can complete the set. Not the most difficult piece on the list but utterly lovely!

 

Giuseppe Rabboni: Sonata No 8 in C major from Sonatas for Flute and Piano

If you didn’t include the Sonata in A minor for grade 5 then perhaps now is your chance to explore these wonderful sonatas. This rather expensive book comes with a beautiful performance and play-along CD – great for de-stressing in a traffic jam!

This slow, one movement piece is completely charming, and once you have stopped worrying about how black it looks on the page, relatively straightforward technically.  You do need a great sound though, and immaculate intonation would be an added bonus! You’ll love it!

Vivaldi:  Allegro from Concerto in D major RV783

This energetic movement will provide a serious technical workout. You  need to play all those notes through the tutti passages too so stamina will be an issue. It’s easy style-wise though so if you can play it, it plays itself!

 List B:

The two block-buster pieces on this list  are the Gaubert Madrigal and Andy Scott’s And Everything is Still. Start with these and you can’t go wrong! However, there are 2 new pieces by English composers that might be of interest at some point. Both have the same wistful character:

John Frith: Arabesque

This slow, lilting waltz is really appealing. It has good structure which underpins the elusive harmonies and a lovely short cadenza passage. Played with conviction it will sound gorgeous!

 Paul Lewis: Lullaby for Laura from Pictures of Childhood

The same applies to this piece too, but here the style is a little more accessible. The 6/8 rhythms hold the melody together and despite a little technical section in the middle, this is the easier of the two to play successfully.

List C:

The general listing is full of books you might already have. Highlights from them are:

Entr’acte from A Bizet Notebook arranged Simon Hunt 

This is the Entra’cte to Act 4 so it’s full of energy and colour and you get to play both the famous oboe melody as well as the semiquaver flute passages. It works really well as a solo piece and is a great way to get to know yet another of those wonderful Bizet pieces!

Cavallini: Theme and Variation from More Graded Studies for Flute Book 2

More Romantic writing here with a beautiful theme for showing off breathing and tonal flexibility followed by a triplet variation. Quite a workout!

 

Oliver Ledbury: Imaginings from Flute Salad.

If you think you know this book but haven’t looked at the last page please think again.

To play this interesting study you really will need imagination, as it is possible that it’s the first time your student will have encountered this kind of writing. Although not technically difficult, it needs really good pacing and flexibility of both sound and rhythm to capture the meaning of the title. It’s a wonderful piece though and great one to make a good contrast in your programme.

Have fun with all these  – everyone will be happy with whatever you choose!